Mit dem 80-cm-Teleskop

Important information for visitors: to register for all types of excursions call +370 3834 5424 (Mondays through Fridays 8 AM – 4.30 PM).

ANMELDUNG

Dates Duration Prices on working days till 4:00 PM

Mon – Thu nights
Prices on working days after 4:00 PM

Fri – Sun and holiday nights
Adults

8,00 EUR
Adults

8,00 EUR
Students

7,00 EUR
Students

7,00 EUR
1 October – 30 April

Tue – Sat
1 May – 30 September
Mon – Sun
1,5 h Pupils (6 years old and over)

6,00 EUR
Pupils (6 years old and over)

6,00 EUR
Pensioners / disabled

7,00 EUR
Pensioners / disabled

7,00 EUR
Groups of 1-9 people

80,00 EUR
Gift card (for two)

22,88 EUR
Gift card (for family)
28,67 EUR
Gift card (for two)

22,88 EUR
Gift card (for family)
28,67 EUR

 

 

Please note that the sky is different throughout the seasons. For example, sometimes the Moon doesn’t rise at all. Darker nights are better for such observations. The Night-time programme takes place in the open and at considerable altitude, thus we recommend warm clothes. Duration: 1.5 hrs.

ABOUT EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

Title: Celestial objects
Target Audience: Primary School Students

1. An introduction to stars and constellations: using stars to orient yourself in time and space;
2. The mythological understanding of stars and constellations and the origin of their names;
3. Students are taken to the telescope;
4. An introduction to the workings of the dome and telescope;
5. A discussion about the influence of the Moon on the Earth (if the Moon is visible via the telescope);
6. A demonstration of one to five astronomical objects through the telescope:
a) stars;
b) planets;
c) binary stars;
d) stellar clusters;
e) nebulae
f) galaxies;
7. A Q&A game:
a) Why do stars twinkle?
b) What are our immediate neighbouring planets within the solar system?
c) Where is the edge of the Universe?
8. A glimpse of astronauts’ life;
9. Questions and Answers.

Title: The evolution and planets of our star
Target Audience: Secondary School Students

1. An introduction to stars and constellations: using stars to orient yourself in time and space;
2. The mythological understanding of stars and constellations and the origin of their names;
3. Students are taken to the telescope;
4. An introduction to the workings of the dome and telescope;
5. A demonstration of one to five astronomical objects through the telescope:
a) stars;
b) planets;
c) binary stars;
d) star clusters;
e) nebulae;
f) galaxies;
6. A discussion on the influence of the Moon on the Earth (if the Moon is visible via the telescope);
7. A demonstration of planets through the telescope accompanied by an explanation of conditions there:
a) temperature;
b) composition of the atmosphere;
c) atmospheric pressure;
c) atmospheric phenomena;
e) typical landscape;
8. We’ll visit distant star clusters with the help of the telescope;
9. Observation of nebulae, getting an insight into the future of the Sun;
10. Questions and Answers.

Title: From the Earth to the edge of the Universe
Target Audience: Secondary School Seniors

1. An introduction to stars and constellations: using stars to orient yourself in time and space;
2. The mythological understanding of stars and constellations and the origin of their names;
3. Students are taken to the telescope;
4. An introduction to the workings of the dome and telescope;
5. A demonstration of one to five astronomical objects through the telescope:
a) stars;
b) planets;
c) binary stars;
d) star clusters;
e) nebulae;
f) galaxies;
6. A discussion about the influence of the Moon on the Earth and the complexity of manned missions to the Moon (if the Moon is visible via the telescope);
7. We’ll visit our neighbouring planets with the help of the telescope, where we’ll explore the possibility of life in the solar system and exoplanets;
8. Watching star clusters, we’ll try to imagine what our ownstar cluster could look like;
9. Watching nebulae, we’ll learn about the past and future of our solar system;
10. A discussion about the challenges of watching distant objects;
11. What are exoplanets? How diverse are they and how aretheyfound?
12. Questions and Answers.

Title: On the brink of the unknowable.
Target Audience: Adults, Students, Families

1. An introduction to stars and constellations: using stars to orient yourself in time and space;
2. The mythological understanding of stars and constellations and the origin of their names;
3. Students are taken to the telescope;
4. An introduction to the workings of the dome and telescope;
5. A demonstration of one to five astronomical objects through the telescope:
a) stars;
b) planets;
c) binary stars;
d) star clusters;
e) nebulae;
f) galaxies;
6. A demonstration of the Moon, explaining its influence on our planet. A discussion about the conditions on the Moon’s surface and engineering challenges in explorations on the Moon (if the Moon is visible via the telescope);
7. We’ll watch neighbouring planets through the telescope, discussing the complexity of space travel;
8. The search of extraterrestrial life and exoplanets;
9. An overview of the size and age of the Universe;
10. With the help of the telescope, we’ll observe star clusters and will try to image our own location in space from a different perspective;
11. An overview of recent changes in the model of the Universe and the last remaining unanswered questions;
12. The birth and death of stars, as witnessed by their nebulae;
13. The size of galaxy discs and the mysteries hidden in their centres;
14. Questions and Answers.

Author: Lithuanian Ethnocosmology Museum Educator
Edgaras Zaronskis

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